DRY SPELL TO CONTINUE

RIO GRANDE VALLEY:

It seems all significant rain chances have subsided for the Rio Grande Valley, at least for the next few days.  With what little rain the Valley got yesterday, it is only but a drop compared to what it really needs for normal values this time of year.  Most of the rain stayed north of the 4 counties of the Rio Grande Valley.  Brooks and Kenedy Counties got the majority of the rain, picking up as much as two inches in some areas, figure 1 below shows.   This was, sadly, the best shot of widespread rain the Valley will see in for a while.

Figure 1. Preliminary rainfall amounts that fell on 5/12/2011. Image courtesy: NWS Brownsville

Forecast 

Satellite imagery shows an upper level ridge over northwest Mexico.  This is allowing for upper level northwest flow over this region.  At the surface, a cold front is currently located  just south of San Antonio, and will push through the Valley  tonight.  Return flow from yesterday’s convective thunderstorms is allowing for easterly winds today, which might allow for a couple of showers to develop late afternoon/early evening, ahead of the cold front.  In fact, current radar (4:10 PM CDT) shows a couple of showers popping up in northern/northwestern Hidalgo County.   Showers will be brief and moderate at best, lightning and thunder are possible.  Showers will still be possible over night, into Saturday morning, but minimal. By Saturday afternoon, all chances of rain will be gone.  Temperatures, however, will feel quite nice after the cold front passage.  Expect temperatures to be in the upper 80s in the upper Valley and lower 80s near the coast. Temperatures will remain at or below normal for the next two or three days.  Dewpoints will also drop after the front passes through the Valley.  Temperatures and dewpoint temperatures will slowly return back to normal and above normal values as next week progresses.

Figure 2. Edinburg's Forecast issued 5/13/2011

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About Brian

University of Oklahoma graduate with a degree in Meteorology. Follow me on Twitter: @WeatherInformer
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